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teach japan economy at georgetown. you're making the summit interesting again. the interesting problems that you face, and i d not envy you, is you said the fits call consolidation, the consumption tax will go up next year and the following year, and you're certainly aware that will take a big hit on consumption on income that will have a negative impact on the economy, and i'm wondering how you're balancing these two different issues of fiscal consolidation and demand. [speaking japanese] >> translator: i think you have hit on the most important point, because whenever we may try to increase the taxes, it does not necessarily result in increasing the tax revenue. we have known the actual examples which have happened in the past in many nrsakg ne >> you can watch the rest of this online as we take you live now to the heritage foundation in washington, d.c. for remarks by senator mike lee of utah. he'll be talking about the conservative movement and the future of the republican party. >> in his most recent book, "we still hold these truths: rediscovering our principles, reclaiming our fu
economy still in front of us that we need solutions for. and i think the women can very much be part of that debate in bringing it forward. >> i've always been struck by the fact that even when there weren't 20, that the women senators have always bonded across party lines. and across ideological lines. i know that lisa murkowsky's vote against gun background checks was a big disappointment to many of you and she was supposed to be the host of tonight's get-together until it was moved to the white house. and heidi heitkamp, how difficult might that conversation with with the white house. we told that the white house was very angry with her to have voted against the background checks. >> you know, andrea, both heidi heitkamp and lisa murkowsky voted for the gun trafficking bill. there was a measure that they were willing to support to end gun trafficking, straw purchasing, pro enforcement measures. so i think there's bipartisan support for these bills, i think we can find consensus going forward and we have to work a little harder. i find the women to be very open to these issues and
, but until the economy improves they're the not going to get out of the way and i think because of that, this market will go up and more talk about that this week. >> we're only what, a couple-- we were down on the week about a couple hundred points, that's not a major selloff by any means. larry, thanks indeed. you're saying the market is trying to go up, we shall see. we have a news background, not yet occurred, at ten o'clock, half hour from now we're going to get the existing home sales, a very big pointing that is supposedly improving housing market. you'll get the numbers as we them, too. i want to warn you, coming up on friday, the latest gdp numbers, they're going to be inflated and show a rate of growth maybe 3%, very strong. but, there's a new calculation involved. so watch out there. the dow is now open for business. we're up 5 in the very early going, yeah, the up trend in place, first thing this monday morning. and why are we going to show you the price of a foreign corporation? why are we doing that? i'll tell you because the japanese stocks are going straight up as the ye
were worried already about the underlying fundmentals of the economy and market. what did you mean by that? >> separating the two, the economy and the markets are kind of acting like on one side slow growth particularly on the revenue side world wide including china and we understand the dependence on what is happening with the feppeds -- feds with the zero cost of money . on the other hand, we have an issue of people looking for a safe haven. united states is probably the safest democratic country right now and a growing acceptance that interest rates will go up. particularly in 2014 . they are rotating on the bond and going into the equitty conflict. you have a good news/bad news kind of thing. that supported the market in the end of the day. so much money is looking for a home. on the other hand, there is a rude awakening before it is all over. >> you know when you look at the market in general and what is an aggressive run up look at the past week, i guess it shouldn't surprise you. i do i want want to overly bore the viewers and over do it. but the sectors most impacted were h
worried about china especially about the economy after the lower than expected growth numbers that we saw this week. and he addressed that. he was talking a bit about the concerns about rising debt levels and he played those down. he played down the weaker growth. >> i don't think people should panic about chinese economy will continue to grow at the sustainable level. the government's target could be fulfilled without much difficulty and we aim at the quality of the growth. i don't think achieving 7, 7.5% is a big deal for china. i don't think so. >> the fund invests heavily in resources. i couldn't help myself from asking him specifically about gold. he believes the sudden drop in gold is general instability in the global economy. he hopes it comes back at some point soon. >> thank you very much. we were watching that and that's the perfect segue. we've been watching what's happening and it's important to see what the chinese think about this and no better person than cic chairman. we'll talk about gold and what's been happening not only with gold but also oil prices after yesterday slu
. it is the perfect example of the program benefits for the economy and local community where jobs are scarce and a part of vermont where conventional lending is not an option. we appreciate the inclusion of permanent authorization of this important program. we also very much appreciate inclusion of the reforms to the program, highly important to employers in the seasonal industries. ski resorts in the winter, beach communities and this summer rely on these workers to not -- and not only prove to be excellent employees but bring a cultural experience to states that do not necessarily enjoyed a great deal of diversity. when a trained employee can return for several years in a row, it is a great benefit to all. we thank you for including the sections into the bill. in order to enhance security while adding -- in order to enhance security while also facilitating legitimate travel and trade, we strongly support the addition of but 3500 custom boer patrol officers included in the legislation. in order to ensure that officers are allocated properly, we urge the committee to work with cpb to specify
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
. the economy is getting worse. but the fed is all in. they're at 85 a month. now, maybe some people like jim bulllard are talking about doing more, but that's not on the fed's table right now. what's on their table is potentially tapering out of the 85 a month when the market wants more. the market is stuck. they want more from the fed, because the economy is weakening, or they want the economy to rebound and nothing's happening and we jump around all over the place. >> warren, what do you think? you've been constructive on this market all through the first quarter. you felt like there was more to go here. but do you feel like the psychology is changing with the volatility that we've seen this week? >> i'll tell you, this week has been a little bit troubling, and i have been pretty bullish up until this point. when you tend to see days like this, where the day after day, up and down bid on the dow, 100-plus point move on any given day, that's a sign that this market is truly struggling. >> are you rethinking your bullish position, at least for the short-term? >> a little bit. i think the thi
.3 trillion to the economy. if you shut that down you are crippling the economy. 137,000 operations a day. if we shut that down that will be an economic catastrophe. > our guest reporter -- >> thank you. you just spoke to the nature of the air traffic control system being quite a bit antiquated. that brings up to questions. does the fact it sort of is pre- digital reduce the risk of a catastrophic attack like rerouting a plane, and as you transition to a next-generation and will that increase the risk posed by the cyber threat? >> that is an interesting question. the older systems, you are right, they are less digitized. so the types of threats are different. as you know. as we modernize the system we are increasing the ability to enter into the system. weree old days, before we worried about cybersecurity the faa was concerned -- considered the air traffic system a closed system. it was pretty much that way. now, as we expand the system we have more people introducing things into the system and we modernize the system. as we go to space-based, aircraft are going to become a note in an in
traffic control system, there's $1.3 trillion to the economy. if you shut that down, you're crippling the economy. me 810 million passengers a year, about 137,000 operations a day. be we shut -- if we shut that down, that's going to be an economic catastrophe. >> host: our guest reporter, gautham nagesh, of cq roll call. >> thank you. you just spoke to the nature of the air traffic control system being quite a bit antiquated. so that brings up two questions. does the fact that it's sort of predigital reduce the risk of a catastrophic attack by rerouteing a plane, and as you transition to a next generation system, will that increase the risk that is posed by the cyber threat? >> guest: yeah, that's an interesting question. you know, the older systems, you're right, they're less digitized. so the types of threats are different, as you know. as we modernize theysm, we're increasing the aby enter into syste in the old days, before we were worried about cybersecurity and cyber attacks, the faa was considered the air traffic system itself a closed system. nobody could get in. and it was pre
. that is simply not good enough. it keeps the united states competitive and our global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion about what is going on in america, i traveled to germany. a cool tour ofng his butchery, he told me how things are done in germany compared to america. there are many specialis america. our apprenticeship system in germany is very dynamic. our workers are used in many areas of the work. my american friend was surprised to see the same staff sleeping and serving. and all the necessary things are learned in a three-year apprenticeship. this apprenticeship system serves as a worldwide example and should definitely be maintained. apprentices' ships? not good enough? i needed some sort of explanation. that is what i spoke to dr. orsino, headmaster of west mr. academy. what kind of challenge to educators face today? there's a time in which the mother, father, children would ents gto school andnts wlde they only have one parent or there are issues at all. they bring those challenges into the classroom. i think schools should help children love to learn, love to read, becom
will not be at jac jacn hole sim this year. my next guest said that we're seeing a slowdown in the economy after a stock first quarter, joining us, wells fargo chief economist, john sylvia, you see a slowdown here? >> there is a slowdown that is what bothered market, stock market a little bit, we a single family housing stocks, retail sales disappointing. building into the commodity market, chinese economic growth is disappointing. people at the inning of year think this economy will take off, and earnings will be strong, then as year goes down they tamper down those expectations. >> you know there is one stock that stands a metaphor, caterpillar, we see them with disappointining results off 42 their earnings, because they are off in the mining sector, but they tell us about good news, just the op ship of what said in -- opposite of what you said in china in their outlook. >> caterpillar is a true global business, they have a lot of infrastructure, a lot of mining and lot of development in many of the asian economies, looking at u.s. companies as traditional as manage mcdonald's and coca-ca ha
states competitive in our global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion of what is going on in america, i traveled to germany -- he told up with me how things were done in germany. there are many such special in america. our apprenticeship program in germany is very dynamic. wasmerican friends surprised to see the same staff sweeping and serving. things areessary learned in the three-year apprenticeship. it serves as a worldwide example and should be maintained. >> apprentice ships? not a good enough? i needed some sort of explanation. that is why i spoke to the headmaster of westminster academy. >> one of the challenge that educators face is the changing of the family. there was a time in which the mother, father, children would be a home in which they would be growing up with both parents. now when students go to school in the only have one parent or there are issues in the home, they're bringing those challenges and to the classroom. what schools could should do it should help children love to learn, love to read, it becomes thinkers, become learners, become problem so
he told me about the challenges inherent in a unified european economy, part of the conversation this week. >> vastly different social security systems, pension systems, health care systems. if europe wants to move to more common funding of these systems is, which is one of the options at the end of the fiscal union, then they need to harmonize the systems before they move to a fiscal union. if you're talk:00 the common fiscal policy or a fiscal union, it's a decade or more off. >> we had in washington this week, what are your thoughts in terms of how the banks look in the next couple of years? are they going to be forced to sell assets and separate plain vanilla deposit businesses from investment bank, capital markets business? >> the issue is going to be going forward, even if you're well capitalized, can you resolve a bank, even a large bank if it runs into problems. and there i've seen some recent debates among the regulators, and the mood seems to have swung from having very sophisticated systems of separating these to simply say since it will be very difficult, let's just e
? >> my instinct tells me that the answer is no, that in economic terms i think the market, the economy at large will move beyond this relatively quickly. but at the same time, there may be some lingering impact in terms of investor sentiment. the sell-off clearly that occurred on friday and then again on monday, in my opinion, was a reassessment of the pace of global growth. important to point out that most of the weakness yesterday was already in the market before the bombings took place. but clearly, there is an impact on investor sentiment, a reminder that it's a dangerous world. and so you may see a little bit less of a risk appetite going forward. in economic terms, i think we'll move beyond it fairly quickly. >> yeah. john, i guess you would ask, at this point, you wouldn't think that consumers would change behavior based on this. it could potentially aveng -- i don't know, whatever group you want to talk about, jonathan, restaurants or any type of tourists activities. nothing to expect at this point, do you think? >> if you said to me are consumers going to be spending time watc
our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> somebody clearly framed them. i don't know who exactly but by framed them and then shot the boy dead. i can't reach anyone. i don't know about my children. i'm scared for my boy. they will shoot him dead, and then just say, he had weapons. where can he get weapons for god's sake? they're picking them up at rubbish dumps or what? i'm scared for my son, for his life. they should arrest him. bring him alive. alive. in the judicial system should investigate everything, who is right and who is guilty. >> neil: that's the father of dzhokar tsarnev, still missing out there, still anywhere. trying to find him. the older brother was killed last night in the shootout. we agree on the key legal point, being preferable to catch the brother alive. >> many reasons, you want him alive, want to talk with him, interrogate him, want to know who was he with, who supplied these things? you think about the two young terrorists out there, they couldn't -- it's very unlikely they did everything all of t
in the u.s. economy as the stock falls 20 plus percent over the last year. we will battle out if this stock should even be in your portfolio. billionaires, maybe news corp. ceo and berkshire hathaway warren buffett are onto something. as to more billionaires start reading in on investing in newspapers. "countdown to the closing bell" starts right now. ♪ liz: 82 years old and can still throw a newspaper like he was a kid. that's mean, everybody, i am liz claman. we need you to focus on the s&p 500 because today it is all about setting new highs, not lower. after the market first week in a year, a new day today, look at what is powering us higher. they're all rich and not 52-week highs, but all-time highs. 60 stocks in the s&p 500 hitting new highs today. 13 of them happen to be utility stocks, which tend to be defensive plays when folks are nervous. northeast utilities, edison among the standouts. leading the s&p higher at the very top, non-other than netflix, which is up about 6.75%, was up more than 7% earlier. netflix said report earnings ofn just about an hour. take a look at this year
, boost the u.s. economy as supporters claim it will? lou dobbs is here. lori: let's update you on the markets as we do every 15 minutes, happening fast and furiously. we have the first check in this hour with nicole. what's the word on the floor among traders there, nicole? >> a couple things to note, obviously, we were selling off, back looking at what we looked at on monday, monday, we dropped 265 points, below even those levels. the vix, fear index, up 20% easily showing the nervousness in the market. selling across the board, particularly in economic sensitive areas like energy and technology, and apple, for example, below $400, and we'll is more on that throughout the show. the one thing to note is the volume is not as heavy like we saw on monday. there's less volume and less conviction to the selling; however, the selling is happening across the board. there's economically sensitive areas like financials bringing me to bank of america. reporting their quarterly numbers, look at bank of america. this weighing on the dow jones industrials, but more importantly, bank of amer
obama, i sided with john kerry, i sided with barney frank. on ensuring our entire economy did not collapse. the bush administration for eight years had turned a blind eye to the fact that a casino had been set up on wall street that was now leading to a collapse of our economy. in 2008, i did not support any of the bush administration era financial regulation policies. but when the threat was that the system was going to collapse and hurt every family in america, i did vote to protect our financial system from collapsing and you did not. in addition, on telecommunications, yes, it was my legislation that broke down the telecom monopolies, cable monopolies that led to a broadband revolution beginning in 1996 that has created millions of jobs in the united states of america, including tens of thousands of them here in the massachusetts economy. and i'm very proud of that. and my name is on the legislation, steve. and i'm proud that my name is on much of that legislation because it was my job to go to washington -- >> that's my point. that's my point. you said we weren't -- that'
: thank you for coming on. dagen: government funding is a nonstarter, not a kick starter for the economy. that will not get in the way of the white house trying to spend more money speak that is true, dagen. people in a sense almost do not real. government spending went to this huge peak after tarp. over 25% of our economy. it has now fallen as a share of gdp. we are down close to 22% of gdp. it is still too big. government is actually falling as a share of gdp. first-quarter, the quarter that we just finished will get data for that in about a week. we are expecting about 3% growth. that is pretty good news from the economic front. dagen: is that already factored into this stock market? >> well, at least in the short term i think you are right. i believe the stock market itself is undervalued considerably. in other words, if you go back to early 2009, it is really the rise in profits that has driven this market. if we get any extension, what the investment community called multiples, the stock market could go even higher. the dow is worth it fair value 18,500. we have these pullbacks eve
>>> you hear a lot of people fretting about how economies around the world are doing based on that broad, big-picture macro stuff. that's known as top-down. not me, no. i'm a bottoms up guy. i like to see how individual companies are actually doing, and try to extrapolate from there. take snap-on, the largest distributor of premium hand and power tools, the company that gets the lion'share of i sale from auto repair shops and dealersh dealerships. but they also do some business in aerospace and manufacturing. they're a fabulous read on how all types of companies are doing across this country and in europe, china, too. europe, 21% of snap-on sales. snap-on reported this morning and while the company reported a 6 cent earnings beat, terrific, off a $1.34 basis, revenues came in a bit light, 0.9% higher year over year. in response, the stock got hit. it fell $1.63 or about 2%. it's still up 19% since the last time we spoke with the ceo and the stock just hit a 52-week high the other day. we need to know more about what snap-on's been up to. so let's drill down with nick pinchuck, the chairm
." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion is still not known; officials said today there's no evidence of foul play. a man using his cell phone captured the moment last night when the west fertilizer company plant exploded. that flattened buildings withi
-causing chemicals to freely circulate in our economy. they will find it unthinkable to assume an attitude of silence and willful ignorance about our ecology. >> sandra steingraber wouldn't stay silent. today she is at the very heart of the environmental human rights movement that she prophesied. she's fighting to identify and eliminate carcinogens in our air, water and food, and to stop fracking, that controversial extraction of natural gas from deep beneath the earth. she is one of the seneca lake 12, a group of activists who last month blocked the gates of a natural gas storage facility in the beautiful finger lakes region of new york state. on a bitterly cold day in march, they were arrested as they demonstrated against the environmental dangers of fracking and the storing of natural gas in nearby abandoned salt mines. for now, new york has declared a moratorium that prohibits fracking in the state while studies are completed. but, there's no guarantee that gas obtained by fracking elsewhere won't be stored in those salt caverns. as you can see, for sandra steingraber, there is no line between he
and perhaps boosting our economy if we can't be sure who to let in? with me now are american enterprise scholar maaed din, we also have economist extraordinaire, professor peter morici. thanks for joining us. madeleine, let me start with you. as we said, as we look at this immigration bill, you can immediately feel a reaction coming out of what happened with boston. to slow down on anything that we might be doing including student visas, including asylum, including some of the workers that we would need especially in the area of student visas who might graduate and then be productive in their economy. what are your thoughts on this? >> well, melissa, that's a great question, and thanks for having me here to talk about this. the immigration bill that's before the senate right now, it's a great piece of legislation. and it would have no bearing whatsoever on the very tragic events that happened in boston. the reality is that people who are here, unfortunately, be they native or immigrant, sometimes you commit horrific acts. but we don't base immigration policy on that. we should base it o
despite the fact that these jobs are among the highest paying and the most stable jobs in our economy today. it is imperative that we encourage more young americans n.i.t. e studies in the fields. in particular because of the stark racial and gender gaps we see in the programs, it is imperative that we encourage more young women and students of color to enter these fields. we simply won't be able to remain a global leader in these mportant fields without more -- with more than 50% of our nation's brainpower sitting on the sidelines. h.r. 967 doesn't go as far as i would like it to go in addressing these challenges but it does show the need to educate more students in n.i.t. fields and provide the necessary authority for the agencies to pay an important and appropriate role here. and finally, i would be remiss not to mention that nitr-d program serves as a coordinating and planning umbrella for all unclassified federal cybersecurity r&d. our committee addressed specific needs in cybersecurity , r&d separately in h.r. 756 but in doing so, we made sure that both the intellectual and fina
with the underpinnings of education and issues like that then allow us to be competitive in a global economy. i think the potential is there. we need to get our act together and that means we need to sit down, work together and resolve issues. .ost: larry, ohio independent caller. caller: good morning. host: good morning. caller: this gentleman keeps referring to the crime scenes, the violent crimes. 99% of us gun owners are law- abiding and that is the way we use our guns. internet sales -- you cannot ship a gun in the united states unless it is shipped by a fll dealer and once you receive that done at your dealer, you have to go through background checks. on the crystal ball thing -- host: larry, let me leave it there and have the congressman respond because that is the front page of "the new york times" dealing with internet sales. what do you make of his comment? guest: first of all, we do have background checks today, but the problem is there are loopholes. the number is about half of the gun sales in the country are not subject to a background check. some are emaciated on the internet. some are
on fixing it. immigration reform is vital to securing our borders, just starting our economy, and ensuring for access to that great american dream. the current status quo on immigration makes no sense. we turn away people from entering the country who could create thousands of jobs and let people crossing our borders who take away jobs. r oach ibanced. the border securitystro,ut achi. the path to citizenship is tough, but it is accessible. yes, our bill does secure the border first, but it treats the situation of those living in the shadows as an equally urgent priority. this is by design. we believe that americans will support sensible solutions to dealing with the undocumented and future legal immigrants, but only if they are convinced there will not be future waves of illegal immigrants. when the 11 million come out of the shadows and it will not only improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and its economies. in fact, conservative economist douglas holtz beacon has found that immigration reform will save taxpayers $2.70 trillion a. we what this legi
. -- voyeurism. >> there will will certainly be taking a very close look. >> the world's emerging economy are saying german investment and bilateral trade. last week it was the indian leader here signing off and billions in deals. >> this tuesday, the ecuador president has been at the german capital. he is here for the 13th annual conference. the region is in the midst of a massive boom with german exports up by 39% last year alone. >> he is in germany for the first time. the president has high expectations of berlin and he is full of praise for his own country. >> ecuador is one of the most dynamic countries and latin america. the economy across latin america grew by 3.5% between 2007 and 2012. but in ecuador, it grew by 3.3%. >> the small, latin american country has not been very high on the german business sectors agenda until now. generally, interest in latin america has grown considerably recently. that is despite trade barriers in certain areas. german investment already amounts to 30 billion euros. >> they just the same difficulty as others. medium-sized companies today are ready t
into the future. they're estimating the pace of growth for economies around the world. joining us now from the business desk. good morning. what do they see? >> good morning. the results overall point to slower growth. those in japan suggest things are picking up. the international monetary fund has upgraded japan's economic outlook the next two years on expectations the country's bold monetary easing policy and weaker yen will help boost its economy. imf officials released the world's latest economic outlook and slowly downgraded the world economic forecast. and predict it will grow 1.6% this year, up .4 of a percentage point and they doubled the growth forecast next year to 1.4%. they expect the bank of japan's aggressive monetary easing to boost the growth rate. >> japan is forge iing a path o its own. it may have been more likely to call this a 3 1/2 recovery rather than a speed recovery. >> although the yen value has declined significantly in the recent past, the monetary policy followed by the boj is appropriate but at the same time, imf officials urge japan to work out a long term f
and the economy did not help the last 10 years to make that story any better. so with that, i want to just give a hearty thanks to maria's leadership for the last decade-and-a-half for putting together this project and her continued perseverance to make this happen. today we celebrate the sale of the land for the transbay transit tower. to the entrance transbay transit authority, for the first time i met mr. heinz, i can going to hang out with them more because i have heard a lot of stories between you that will help me run this city better. i will say that when this transit tower is complete, it will have the impact of transforming our city skyline with the tallest structure west of the mississippi and chicago. i'm about to leave for china tomorrow, and i get to go to china and tell them we've got the tallest building west of the mississippi, what about you? they are probably going to tell me they have tall buildings there as well but we at least have bragging rights. the state of the art, sustainable features, a plan, 1.4 million square foot office tower, developed, owned and operated by he
the state of the economy. other people are talking about technical reactions, but also the numbers from the usa are not as good anymore. bank of america reported results that have been far on next -- under expectations. >> we will stay in frankfurt for a closer look at the numbers. the dax -- it is down by more than 2.3%. the euro stoxx 50 is down by more than 2%. across the atlantic, things there are also down in negative territory. the euro is drifting lower against the greenback, trading at a value of 1.3044. >> the british retailer tesco, the world's third-largest, says it is pulling out of the u.s. market. profits fell for the first time in 20 years. >> empathy says it wants it wants to refocus on its british operations ash the company says it wants to refocus on its british operations -- the company says it wants to refocus on its british operations. >> millions of germans were disappointed today when they went to get their mail and, lo and behold, the letterboxes were empty. no holiday postcards from friends. that's because thousands of postal workers have gone on warning strik
weeks. >> the german economy is slowly awakening from its winter sleep. the country's leading economic research institutes have presented their spring forecast, saying they expect moderate growth of about 0.8% this year, but the think tanks are a bit more upbeat about 2014, where the forecast growth to reach about 2%, provided the current eurozone debt crisis does not spiral out of control. >> the economic outlook is bright. it is been booming bavaria. the state boasts near full employment. businesses like this are wide. it is an engineering firm. residential -- residents are up, order books full. it provides a snapshot of the wider german economy. one of the country's leading think tanks believes it will keep on growing because there are tentative signs europe is on the mend. >> these figures reflect the diminishing uncertainty and the fact the markets are now calmer. >> the think tank's forecast is much more optimistic than the german government policy official estimate, and ultimately, there will be exporters who decide who gets it right and who gets it wrong. >> onto thursday's mar
on the economy. people are eliminating chicken and duck from their diet. this is causing serious damage to the poultry industry. >>> city restaurants are losing a lot of money as many kmern vs. stopped ordering poultry fishes. orders have dropped off almost 50%. >> we're very concerned about the damage caused by unfounded rumors. it's a very serious situation for us. >> shoppers are also buying less poultry, both processed and unprocessed. so prices are falling. they're down by 20 to 30% since the first flu case was reported in beijing. and the price of eggs has also fallen by as much as 30%. >> translator: for the good of my health, i'm trying not to eat chicken. >> translator: i don't know how long this situation will last, but i'm really concerned. >> the spreading disease is having an impact on people's daily living. some are taking their own preventive measures. this man works for a company in beijing. he began washing his hands more often, and gargling every morning and evening. helies with his wife and daughter. among them, they keep more than 50 medical masks. >> translator: i a
and pursuing the comgo f overyears, fidelity investments, union bank, your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you adjust your retirement plan. rethink and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments. turn here. >> bbc world news was presented >> bbc world news was presented by kcet, - hi, neighbor! today at school, we're choosing something new for the playground! swings or slide! they're both fun to play on! and then, we get to choose a new class pet! be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and he arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to sengthening america's future through education. adcasting
the winners or losers on april 29. >> finance ministers of the g-20 economies are softening their line on austerity. had a policy meeting in washington, d.c., they have agreed to set -- not to set hard targets. the discussions were dominated by talk of the struggling eurozone were harsh austerity measures have failed to lift the region out of its economic troubles. the german finance minister defended berlin's demands that the eurozone's troubled economies continue to cut spending. german shares fell for a sixth day in a row. their longest losing streak since november 2011, that amid disappointing earnings statements from some of the nation's largest companies. our correspondence sent us this summary from frankfurt. >> in the first quarter 2013, the software company has not been able to reach its goals, especially because of a far weaker than expected business in asia. sales have been far under estimates, and investors have been disappointed. they dragged down s&p shares by more than 2.5%, making them the leading loser -- >> saying the by a little early from frankfurt. let's take a clo
is taking its toll not only on the health of the people but also on the economy. as the virus spreads and concerns grow, people are eliminating chicken and duck from their diet. this is causing serious damage to the poultry industry. nhk world's michitaka yamaka reports from beijing. >> reporter: city restaurants are losing a lot of money as many customers have stopped ordering poultry dishes. it's enough to tempt wary diners. orders have dropped almost 50%. >> translator: we're very concerned about the damage caused by unfounded rumors. it's a very serious situation for us. >> reporter: food shoppers are also buying less poultry, both processed and unprocessed. so prices are falling. they are down by 20% to 30%. since the first case reported in beijing. the price of eggs has also fallen by as much as 30%. >> translator: for the good of my health, i'm trying not to eat chicken. >> translator: i don't know how long the situation's going to last, but i'm really concerned. >> reporter: the spreading disease is having an impact on people's daily living. some are taking their own preventiv
have got your's -- europe's third-biggest economy facing problems. what is the likelihood that things will get worse still? >> it is tangible tonight if you are standing outside the parliamentary building. there are thousands gathered in protest. ofs is a country in the grip a serious depression. this economy, 35% of people between the ages and -- of 15 and 25 are out of work. -- thereno indication is many people who feel the political parties are completely detached from the problems of those living there. >> thank you. keeping us up-to-date on the turmoil over the latest italian politics. we go to the u.s.. people in the city of boston are breathing a collective sigh of relief after the arrest of the second suspect in monday's boston marathon bombings. investigators are waiting to interrogate dzhokhar tsarnaev, who is lying seriously injured in a boston hospital. the 19-year-old and his brother are believed to have killed three and wounded more than 170 others. the police are trying to work out what exactly their motive was. >> the spectacular manhunt came to an end here. police sur
almost nothing but no. >> what is the biggest misconception about our economy? >> the deficit is the biggest problem we face. the deficit is not the biggest problem we face. the biggest problem is jobs and wages and getting back growth. >> for decades we have been told don't tax the upper class because the less tax they have the better it is for the middle class, true or false in. >> false. the idea that people at the top are the job creators belies -- the truth about the economy is the middle class they are the job creators because their spending creates jobs. >> so many people have been sold on this for years. >> i don't know why. trickle down economics. if you give more tax breaks to people at the top and companies at the top, you are going to create jobs has been proven over and over again to be false. >> amazing insight from robert rice. >> take a look at your hand. it's telling you something about your future. >> wheb you meet a ceo do you look at their fingers? >> i did. >> best selling author, bronson talks about the fascinatingfind. he talks about the length of your f
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